Great Read! "CANON FODDER: Books by immigrants, foreigners and minorities don’t diminish the ‘classic’ curriculum. They enhance it." by Viet Thanh Nguyen (From Washington Post)

"We must read Shakespeare and authors who are women, Arab, Muslim, queer. Most of the world is neither white nor European, and the United States may be a majority-minority country by mid-century. White people will gain more by embracing this reality rather than fighting it. As for literature, the mind-set that turns the canon into a bunker in order to defend one dialect of English is the same mind-set that closes borders, enacts tariffs and declares trade wars to protect its precious commodities and its besieged whiteness. But literature, like the economy, withers when it closes itself off from the world. The world is coming anyway. It demands that we know ourselves and the Other....."

Read the full article here

EVENT: "After the March RVA: Activism Convening" Hosted by Richmond Peace Education Center, Feb 24, 2018

Details from the Richmond Peace Education Center Facebook Page

After the March: Activism Convening Free & Open to the Public

What is it?

Timed approximately one year after the Trump inauguration, the After the March RVA Activism Convening is an effort by the Richmond Peace Education Center to bring together those that are and want to participate in work aimed at achieving equality. The convening will feature workshops, community conversations, and movement building/networking time. The registration below holds more information about the workshops and conversations.

When is it? And Where?

Saturday, February 24th, 2018 at Diversity Richmond (1407 Sherwood Ave) from 12pm to 5:30pm.

It is free and open to the public. However, we are asking you to please register.

Who is it for?

Everyone! Anyone who is (or has) been doing work to better the community and those who are looking to get involved in creating change have a place here.

What will I get out of this?

We hope that you leave After the March with a new or deepened network of folks to work in movement with and with new or deepened "real life" skills. In addition, some of the workshops at After the March will continue to be offered by the Peace Center throughout 2018. The intention behind After the March is to be engaged in the long-term, so this is not a one & done convening.

Childcare and Transportation Assistance Also Available

Read More Details Here

or Have other questions? Email our advocacy coordinator, Jelani at jelani@rpec.org

 

About the Richmond Peace Education Center

The Richmond Peace Education Center (RPEC) works to build just, inclusive and nonviolent communities through education and action.

 

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Good Read: Understanding Ableism (from EqUUal Access)

"Based on the belief that disability is a defect rather than a dimension of human diversity, ableism affects those with disabilities by inhibiting their access to and power within institutional structures that fulfill needs, like health care, employment, housing, government, education, religion, the media, and the legal system.

“Ideologies and practices that belittle and/or limit people with disabilities arise from ableist attitudes. Ableist attitudes are those that reflect a fear of, and aversion to, or discrimination or prejudice against people with disabilities. They can be as blatant as a refusal to hire someone with an apparent disability, or as subtle as the assumption that everyone attending a concert can stand for two hours. Like racism, sexism, or homophobia, ableism is directed at individuals and built into social structures; it is lived out purposefully, accidentally, and unknowingly. Ableist ideologies shape our media, for example, when people with disabilities are either completely absent or portrayed only as tragic and sad figures. They permeate our dominant standards of beauty and sexiness, definitions of what it means to dance, and measures of healthfulness. They also shape our expectations for leadership and success.”

 “Human variability is immense. We see and hear in varying degrees, our limbs are of different lengths and strengths, our minds process information differently, we communicate using different methods and speeds, we move from place to place via diverse methods, and our eye colors are not the same. Some of us can soothe children, some have spiritual insight, and some discern the emotions of others with astounding skill. Which bodily and mental variabilities are considered inconsequential, which are charming, and which are stigmatized, changes over time—and that is the history of disability.”

from A Disability History of the United States, by Kim E. Nielsen. Boston: Beacon Press, 2012, pp. xvi-xvii....."

READ MORE HERE

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IMPORTANT READ: "The Year I Stopped Breathing: On Being Muslim and American in the Age of Trump" by Moustafa Bayoumi (from The Nation)

Thanks to CVWFP Chapter Member Kalimah Patricia Carter for sharing this important read. 

The Year I Stopped Breathing: On Being Muslim and American in the Age of Trump

Trump didn’t invent Islamophobia, but he has injected it with a new and lethal force.

By Moustafa Bayoumi

 

".....Our fears were not abstract..."

Almost instantly, mosques were vandalized. Muslim parents agonized over their children’s safety at school. Violent assaults increased not only in number but also in ferocity. As all of this was occurring, we were working hard to look out for one another, while also trying not to lose sight of what this catastrophe meant for the nation as a whole....."

"...we can’t let our energies dissipate...."

"...Like the Japanese-American woman from Brooklyn who offered her help to Muslim strangers in 2001, we need to show the level of concern for one another that the times demand. We need to organize our energies to secure a more just and humane future. And we need to do so with a mass surge of people beside us....."

READ THE REST OF THIS IMPORTANT ARTICLE HERE