Good Read: Understanding Ableism (from EqUUal Access)

"Based on the belief that disability is a defect rather than a dimension of human diversity, ableism affects those with disabilities by inhibiting their access to and power within institutional structures that fulfill needs, like health care, employment, housing, government, education, religion, the media, and the legal system.

“Ideologies and practices that belittle and/or limit people with disabilities arise from ableist attitudes. Ableist attitudes are those that reflect a fear of, and aversion to, or discrimination or prejudice against people with disabilities. They can be as blatant as a refusal to hire someone with an apparent disability, or as subtle as the assumption that everyone attending a concert can stand for two hours. Like racism, sexism, or homophobia, ableism is directed at individuals and built into social structures; it is lived out purposefully, accidentally, and unknowingly. Ableist ideologies shape our media, for example, when people with disabilities are either completely absent or portrayed only as tragic and sad figures. They permeate our dominant standards of beauty and sexiness, definitions of what it means to dance, and measures of healthfulness. They also shape our expectations for leadership and success.”

 “Human variability is immense. We see and hear in varying degrees, our limbs are of different lengths and strengths, our minds process information differently, we communicate using different methods and speeds, we move from place to place via diverse methods, and our eye colors are not the same. Some of us can soothe children, some have spiritual insight, and some discern the emotions of others with astounding skill. Which bodily and mental variabilities are considered inconsequential, which are charming, and which are stigmatized, changes over time—and that is the history of disability.”

from A Disability History of the United States, by Kim E. Nielsen. Boston: Beacon Press, 2012, pp. xvi-xvii....."

READ MORE HERE

inclusion .png

IMPORTANT READ: "The Year I Stopped Breathing: On Being Muslim and American in the Age of Trump" by Moustafa Bayoumi (from The Nation)

Thanks to CVWFP Chapter Member Kalimah Patricia Carter for sharing this important read. 

The Year I Stopped Breathing: On Being Muslim and American in the Age of Trump

Trump didn’t invent Islamophobia, but he has injected it with a new and lethal force.

By Moustafa Bayoumi

 

".....Our fears were not abstract..."

Almost instantly, mosques were vandalized. Muslim parents agonized over their children’s safety at school. Violent assaults increased not only in number but also in ferocity. As all of this was occurring, we were working hard to look out for one another, while also trying not to lose sight of what this catastrophe meant for the nation as a whole....."

"...we can’t let our energies dissipate...."

"...Like the Japanese-American woman from Brooklyn who offered her help to Muslim strangers in 2001, we need to show the level of concern for one another that the times demand. We need to organize our energies to secure a more just and humane future. And we need to do so with a mass surge of people beside us....."

READ THE REST OF THIS IMPORTANT ARTICLE HERE

 

In the New Year, Let's Listen to Each Other: Principles and Guidelines for Interfaith Dialogue

"A compendium of concise and handy resources provides insight into the interfaith movement and its treasure chest of wisdom and learning opportunities. The collection explores the goals, types and stages of dialogue and touches on issues such as interfaith etiquette, listening, peace-building, hospitality, respectful presence and dialogue-versus-debate. These principles and guidelines are useful for those who are new to interfaith as well as for veterans of interfaith work."

Dialogue Principles

Dr. Leonard Swidler is a highly respected American scholar in the field of interfaith dialogue. Dr. Swidler has published this set of ten inter-religious principles which have become a classic.  Below please find this “dialogue decalogue. 

FIRST PRINCIPLE

The primary purpose of dialogue is to learn; that is, to change and grow in the perception and understanding of reality, and then to act accordingly.

SECOND PRINCIPLE

Inter-religious, inter-ideological dialogue must be a two-sided project within each religious or ideological community and between religious or ideological communities.

THIRD PRINCIPLE

Each participant must come to the dialogue with complete honesty and sincerity.

FOURTH PRINCIPLE

In inter-religious, inter-ideological dialogue we must not compare our ideals with our partner’s practice, but rather our ideals with our partner’s ideals, our practice with our partner’s practice.

FIFTH PRINCIPLE

Each participant must define himself… Conversely, the interpreted must be able to recognize herself in the interpretation.

SIXTH PRINCIPLE

Each participant must come to the dialogue with no hard-ançl-fast assumptions as to where the points of disagreement are.

SEVENTH PRINCIPLE

Dialogue can take place only between equals… Both must come to learn from each other.

EIGHTH PRINCIPLE

Dialogue can take place only on the basis of mutual trust.

NINTH PRINCIPLE

Persons entering into inter-religious, inter-ideological dialogue must be at least minimally self-critical of both themselves and their own religious or ideological traditions.

TENTH PRINCIPLE

Each participant eventually must attempt to experience the partner’s religion or ideology ‘from within’; for a religion or ideology is not merely something of the head, but also of the spirit, heart, and ‘whole being,’ individual and communal.

Website of Dr. Swidler’s Dialogue Institute in Philadelphia, USA:  http://dialogueinstitute.org/

 

More from Scarborough Missions on Interfaith Interaction Here

 

interfaith peace.jpg